Ariane Lange

Ariane Lange

Reporter, Social Sciences and Business & Economics

@arianelange

Ariane Lange, based in Oakland, California, covers Social Sciences and Business & Economics for The Academic Times. Prior to that, Ariane worked at BuzzFeed News covering gender issues. She is particularly interested in law and structural inequality. She has a bachelor's degree from the University of California, Berkeley.

The arrival of European settlers led to large-scale extinction of snakes and lizards in Guadeloupe. (Unsplash/Jonathan Vasquez)
The arrival of European settlers led to large-scale extinction of snakes and lizards in Guadeloupe. (Unsplash/Jonathan Vasquez) European colonizers caused the extinction of 50% to 70% of snakes and lizards in Guadeloupe, a new finding that illustrates the devastating impact of colonialism on life.

Ancient sites with more architectural features, like these cliff dwellings in Bears Ears National Monument, are still highly influential in plant life today. (Shutterstock)
Ancient sites with more architectural features, like these cliff dwellings in Bears Ears National Monument, are still highly influential in plant life today. (Shutterstock) Ancient people who lived the mesas and canyons of what is now called Bears Ears, Utah, are still influencing the plant life in the area today — evidence that Indigenous ecological knowledge is essential to the future, the authors of a new study argue.

Racist practices are ingrained in much of medicine. (Shutterstock)
Racist practices are ingrained in much of medicine. (Shutterstock) Clinical practice guidelines are meant to streamline medical care, but many contain recommendations based on race that give white patients special treatment and require Black patients to get sicker before a doctor will help them, a new paper says.

Protracted work schedules might contribute to gentrification. (Shutterstock)
Protracted work schedules might contribute to gentrification. (Shutterstock) Gentrification is "still somewhat of a mystery," the economist behind a new paper says, but it's partly driven by the increasingly long hours of higher-income workers who move to city centers to cut commutes and subsequently demand less crime and more restaurants.

U.S. pharmaceutical companies test drugs in foreign countries but often fail to make them available once approved. (AP Photo/Nariman El-Mofty)
U.S. pharmaceutical companies test drugs in foreign countries but often fail to make them available once approved. (AP Photo/Nariman El-Mofty) Large pharmaceutical companies test drugs in dozens of foreign countries, but then don't bother to make the drugs available to those nations once the drugs are approved in the U.S. — a significant bioethics issue involving people the industry calls "partners in research."

A woman walks with a box of produce she received during a food drive. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
A woman walks with a box of produce she received during a food drive. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez) Policy changes in the U.K. have left the lowest-income people more likely to fall into deep poverty, even as the proportion of people considered "below the poverty line" has stagnated and thus masked increased suffering.

Men get more constructive criticism at work, but it makes them madder. (Pexels/Sora Shimazaki)
Men get more constructive criticism at work, but it makes them madder. (Pexels/Sora Shimazaki) Women get dinged for their ambition and subtly encouraged to be more "feminine" even when they're still low-ranking at work, while men get much more upset when they're criticized, a new study of workplace dynamics found.

Cattle seen at a feedlot in Columbus, Nebraska. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
Cattle seen at a feedlot in Columbus, Nebraska. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik) Food production kills 15,900 people in the U.S. each year through air pollution — but thousands of lives could be saved with some relatively simple reforms, researchers found.

The 20th century didn't bring quite the flourishing of the middle class that popular narratives describe. (Unsplash/Gonzalo Facello)
The 20th century didn't bring quite the flourishing of the middle class that popular narratives describe. (Unsplash/Gonzalo Facello) A century of wealth records for dead English people reveals that the rise of the middle class after World War II was a mirage — only the top 30% of people got richer, while the bottom 60% continued to die with virtually nothing.

Access to contraception gives girls and young women a better shot at a good start in life. (Pexels/Emily Ranquist)
Access to contraception gives girls and young women a better shot at a good start in life. (Pexels/Emily Ranquist) Teen girls and young women in Colorado graduated high school at higher rates after the state expanded access to affordable contraception — some of the strongest quantitative evidence of better reproductive choices shaping the life trajectories of women.

Most companies flourish when they go multinational, but for Asia-Pacific firms, it might be better to stay home. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
Most companies flourish when they go multinational, but for Asia-Pacific firms, it might be better to stay home. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu) Expanding internationally sounds good for business — but in the Asia-Pacific region, it might actually hold back profitability, a new study found.

Even small amounts of financial help can keep veterans from becoming homeless and improve their health outlook. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
Even small amounts of financial help can keep veterans from becoming homeless and improve their health outlook. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong) Financial assistance, even short term, can improve the health of veterans at risk of homelessness — a finding that suggests more money and earlier intervention could save health care costs while keeping people housed.