Ariane Lange

Ariane Lange

Reporter, Social Sciences and Business & Economics

@arianelange

Ariane Lange, based in Oakland, California, covers Social Sciences and Business & Economics for The Academic Times. Prior to that, Ariane worked at BuzzFeed News covering gender issues. She is particularly interested in law and structural inequality. She has a bachelor's degree from the University of California, Berkeley.

News about "the squad" notwithstanding, women are still drastically underrepresented in congress. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
News about "the squad" notwithstanding, women are still drastically underrepresented in congress. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) People think there are way more women in politics than there actually are — and a study has uncovered that young people have the most vivid imaginations of all.

New evidence as to how demographics factor into suicide rates could improve prevention efforts. (Unsplash/Mariah Solomon)
New evidence as to how demographics factor into suicide rates could improve prevention efforts. (Unsplash/Mariah Solomon) There are significant differences in U.S. suicide death rates and methods across age, race and sex — and younger generations of people of color, particularly Black people, are becoming more likely to die by nonfirearm suicide, a finding that researchers say has implications for mental health interventions and emergency counseling.

"Shadow banks" profited off the pandemic and then made it worse. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)
"Shadow banks" profited off the pandemic and then made it worse. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola) Shadow banks have made a killing on the market during the coronavirus pandemic, perpetuating and intensifying the economic status quo in a system working well for the ultra-rich while destabilizing the lives of everyday people, a new paper argues.

The number of trees in a neighborhood has an impact on residents' well-being. (Unsplash/Craig Vodnik)
The number of trees in a neighborhood has an impact on residents' well-being. (Unsplash/Craig Vodnik) The vast majority of lower-income urban neighborhoods across the U.S. have fewer trees per capita than higher-income neighborhoods, an inequity that contributes to higher temperatures, poor health outcomes and, in some cases, premature death.

Eating more chicken to be healthier? It turns out you might just be eating more meat in general. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
Eating more chicken to be healthier? It turns out you might just be eating more meat in general. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson) Meat consumption is going up globally, and while meat is inherently greenhouse gas-intensive, an analysis found that less carbon-polluting meats aren't acting as a replacement — they're just piling on.

Along with its many other benefits, it turns out that paid maternal leave might help babies' language skills. (Unsplash/Marcin Jozwiak)
Along with its many other benefits, it turns out that paid maternal leave might help babies' language skills. (Unsplash/Marcin Jozwiak) Paid maternal leave is not just better for caregivers who experience the physical stress of childbirth and the exhaustion of raising a newborn; it also seems to help babies learn language, according to new research.

Could labor unions be the way out of the income-inequality morass? (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Larma)
Could labor unions be the way out of the income-inequality morass? (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Larma) In "advanced" economies, income inequality has grown more stark as a result of workers' declining power — a finding that both contradicts prior research and points to clear policy solutions, the researchers behind a new study argue.

Restriction on state spending often perpetuate race-based income inequality going back decades. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
Restriction on state spending often perpetuate race-based income inequality going back decades. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano) Restricting state tax revenues or spending exacerbates income inequality, making these limitations "bad public policy," the researcher behind a new study says.

Kids who interact with CPS, even if there's no finding of abuse, are more likely to commit suicide. (Unsplash/Michal Parzuchowski)
Kids who interact with CPS, even if there's no finding of abuse, are more likely to commit suicide. (Unsplash/Michal Parzuchowski) Children with any level of child protective services involvement had three times the odds of dying by suicide — a new finding that highlights the need for more robust supportive services and mental health care, even for children whose abuse is not confirmed.

If campaign ads leave you feeling a bit stressed-out, you're not alone. (AP Photo/Jon Elswick)
If campaign ads leave you feeling a bit stressed-out, you're not alone. (AP Photo/Jon Elswick) Exposure to campaign ads increased anxiety levels among U.S. adults on both sides of the aisle during the 2016 election cycle, a finding that may not surprise anyone, though local races likely added to collective anxiety alongside the rancorous presidential race.

The Northern Hemisphere continues to plunder the riches of the South. (AP Photo/Joaquin Sarmiento)
The Northern Hemisphere continues to plunder the riches of the South. (AP Photo/Joaquin Sarmiento) The wealthy nations of the global North exploited $2.2 trillion from the global South in 2017 alone, a new analysis found, a colonial dynamic that allows inequality and wealth hoarding — particularly by the United States.

The anti-porn forces are more religion-based than science-based, surveys find. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)
The anti-porn forces are more religion-based than science-based, surveys find. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo) Conservative politicians have been citing science to support anti-porn legislation, but according to surveys conducted from 1984 to 2018, the only Americans who still broadly support banning porn are biblical literalists — not science believers or skeptics.