Beth Newhart

Beth Newhart

Reporter, Technology and Mind & Behavior

Beth Newhart, based in Chicago, covers Mind & Behavior and Technology for The Academics Times. Beth is a journalist with experience covering culture, business, tech, finance, food, beverage and more. Her work has been featured in international publications, including BeverageDaily, DairyReporter, Crain Communications and Time Out Group. She has a bachelor's degree in journalism from Loyola University Chicago.

A South Korean study showed many parents would be OK with robots taking over certain aspects of child care. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
A South Korean study showed many parents would be OK with robots taking over certain aspects of child care. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)Autonomous social robots are designed for human communication and interaction, but are humans ready to integrate them into daily life? A South Korean study has revealed that working parents are open to the idea of using social robots in child care functions such as socialization, entertainment and consultation, but they are less interested in using them for educational purposes with their kids.

VR headsets are fun, but they're bulky. A new, streamlined design promises to deliver function without the size. (AP Photo/Tony Avelar)
VR headsets are fun, but they're bulky. A new, streamlined design promises to deliver function without the size. (AP Photo/Tony Avelar)A prototype developed by engineers in South Korea can accommodate virtual reality experiences on a device resembling a pair of sunglasses, introducing a new optical system that drastically reduces the physical size of headsets and bringing VR technology closer to adoption.

Brain temperature can be an important health indicator, but measuring it has been tricky until now. (AP Photo/Erika Kinetz)
Brain temperature can be an important health indicator, but measuring it has been tricky until now. (AP Photo/Erika Kinetz)Brain temperature differs from body temperature and is an important indicator of health after an injury, but it's difficult to measure without invasive procedures such as the implantation of temperature probes. A group of researchers has proposed a new biophysical model that can predict personalized brain temperature using data from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of individual brain tissue and vessel structures.

Work stress can affect minds and bodies. (Unsplash/Tim Gouw)
Work stress can affect minds and bodies. (Unsplash/Tim Gouw)Employees dealing with work-induced stress can experience changes to their physiology, according to organizational behavior researchers, which may result in their personality traits fluctuating or even fundamentally changing over time.

There's no such thing as "stress eating," at least for people with binge-eating disorders. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
There's no such thing as "stress eating," at least for people with binge-eating disorders. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)Stressful situations alter brain activity in regions responsible for self-control, like the prefrontal cortex, but these changes in brain activity do not necessarily cause binge eating in people with eating disorders, according to new research, suggesting for the first time that the triggers for this behavior are more complex than previously thought.

A new air monitoring system might stop future pandemics before they start. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
A new air monitoring system might stop future pandemics before they start. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)In order to prevent another global pandemic, scientists have been exploring methods to better detect and contain new viruses before they spread. To that end, a group of engineers have developed an algorithm-based monitoring system that can be integrated into airports for early detection of coronavirus and other respiratory-virus outbreaks.

Changing the way you look at a problem can generate better solutions. (AP Photo/Ron Schwane)
Changing the way you look at a problem can generate better solutions. (AP Photo/Ron Schwane)When presented with an opportunity to change or improve something, adults are more likely to rely on addition to correct a problem, instead of subtracting from it, a team of researchers determined in the first study to analyze additive and subtractive cognitive processes.

Relationships may be endangered by interference from people with certain personality traits. (Unsplash/Kiarash Mansouri)
Relationships may be endangered by interference from people with certain personality traits. (Unsplash/Kiarash Mansouri)People who score high in personality traits that are a part of the "Dark Tetrad"—narcissism, Machiavellianism, psychopathy and sadism—are more likely to interfere in the romantic lives of their family and friends when they dislike or disapprove of a significant other, a new study determined.

What is your sweat telling the world? (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
What is your sweat telling the world? (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)By smelling the sweat of other people, humans can differentiate between sweat that results from fearful or neutral situations, a new study proved, though it's more difficult to determine the level of fear a person is feeling based on sweat alone.

Robotic monitoring may turbocharge U.S. aquaculture. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)
Robotic monitoring may turbocharge U.S. aquaculture. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)Fish farming in the U.S. is a labor-intensive practice that's falling behind more technologically advanced operations in other countries. But a group of engineers from Florida has invented a new robotics system based on machine-learning algorithms that can modernize the industry and automate water-quality monitoring in aquaculture.

A chemical commonly found in plastic has been found to affect pregnancy. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)
A chemical commonly found in plastic has been found to affect pregnancy. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)A new study has provided preliminary evidence that women with high levels of phthalates, a chemical found in common plastics, in their system during pregnancy were more likely to have low levels of the hormone progesterone, and subsequently develop postpartum depression.

Our brain treats listening to music as a reward. (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP)
Our brain treats listening to music as a reward. (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP)The unique pleasure that humans experience from music is a result of the way the brain's auditory and reward circuits communicate, according to a new study that proved this for the first time by stimulating regions of the brain with magnetic currents while people listened and reacted to music.