Beth Newhart

Beth Newhart

Reporter, Technology and Mind & Behavior

Beth Newhart, based in Chicago, covers Mind & Behavior and Technology for The Academics Times. Beth is a journalist with experience covering culture, business, tech, finance, food, beverage and more. Her work has been featured in international publications, including BeverageDaily, DairyReporter, Crain Communications and Time Out Group. She has a bachelor's degree in journalism from Loyola University Chicago.

What is your sweat telling the world? (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
What is your sweat telling the world? (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)By smelling the sweat of other people, humans can differentiate between sweat that results from fearful or neutral situations, a new study proved, though it's more difficult to determine the level of fear a person is feeling based on sweat alone.

Robotic monitoring may turbocharge U.S. aquaculture. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)
Robotic monitoring may turbocharge U.S. aquaculture. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)Fish farming in the U.S. is a labor-intensive practice that's falling behind more technologically advanced operations in other countries. But a group of engineers from Florida has invented a new robotics system based on machine-learning algorithms that can modernize the industry and automate water-quality monitoring in aquaculture.

A chemical commonly found in plastic has been found to affect pregnancy. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)
A chemical commonly found in plastic has been found to affect pregnancy. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)A new study has provided preliminary evidence that women with high levels of phthalates, a chemical found in common plastics, in their system during pregnancy were more likely to have low levels of the hormone progesterone, and subsequently develop postpartum depression.

Our brain treats listening to music as a reward. (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP)
Our brain treats listening to music as a reward. (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP)The unique pleasure that humans experience from music is a result of the way the brain's auditory and reward circuits communicate, according to a new study that proved this for the first time by stimulating regions of the brain with magnetic currents while people listened and reacted to music.

A new dementia fighter might be good shuteye. (Unsplash/Hermes Rivera)
A new dementia fighter might be good shuteye. (Unsplash/Hermes Rivera)Using electrodes to stimulate people's brains with electrical currents while they slept, researchers at a neuroscience lab in Oregon successfully lengthened the amount of time the subjects stayed in the deep sleep stage, which can potentially improve memory and decrease the risk of dementia in older adults.

Soft fabric helps improve robotic grip. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi)
Soft fabric helps improve robotic grip. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi)Robots use conventional grippers made of metal and plastic to grasp and manipulate items and perform human-like tasks, though they are not optimized for holding fragile or irregular objects. In a new study, robotics engineers from Australia enhanced the quality of soft fabric grippers using a powerful adhesive inspired by gecko feet for more versatile, conformable and stronger grasping.

Kids like teachers who "speak their language" ... literally. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
Kids like teachers who "speak their language" ... literally. (AP Photo/LM Otero)Young children respond best to other people who speak with the same accent, dialect or language as themselves, even if they grow up multilingual and exposed to a diverse language environment, according to a new meta-analysis of international studies.

Women suffer from a gender bias when reporting pain. (Unsplash/Diana Polekhina)
Women suffer from a gender bias when reporting pain. (Unsplash/Diana Polekhina)A new study found that even when men and women express the same levels of physical pain, both male and female adults are more likely to consider women's pain to be less intense than men's, displaying a significant gender bias in pain estimation that could be causing disparities in health care treatment.

Robot grip is getting closer and closer to humanlike. (Pixabay/Stefan Schulz)
Robot grip is getting closer and closer to humanlike. (Pixabay/Stefan Schulz)Robots are unable to perform everyday manipulation tasks, such as grasping or rearranging objects, with the same dexterity as humans. But Brazilian scientists have moved this research a step further by developing a new system that uses deep learning algorithms to improve a robot's ability to independently detect how to grasp an object, known as autonomous robotic grasp detection.

Microgravity can make brains slower, (German Aerospace Center)
Microgravity can make brains slower, (German Aerospace Center)Putting astronauts on bed rest at a six-degree angle successfully simulates some of the physical effects of microgravity that are experienced in outer space. A new study found that over the course of two months in these conditions, it took more time for participants to pass a series of cognitive tests that probe abilities crucial in high-pressure situations such as space travel.

Your car might recognize you by how you move. (Pixabay/Gerd Altmann)
Your car might recognize you by how you move. (Pixabay/Gerd Altmann)Smart cars can be made better and safer through driver authentication powered by biometrics technology, according to a recent study that proposed a new technique that captures and identifies a driver's eye movements with a novel machine-learning algorithm.

Giving kids screen time to calm them down could cause big problems down the line. (Unsplash/Samantha Sophia)
Giving kids screen time to calm them down could cause big problems down the line. (Unsplash/Samantha Sophia)When young children misbehave, parents often give them phones, tablets or other devices to calm them down. But this overreliance on electronics to help impressionable toddlers regulate their emotions has the potential to cause behavioral problems as they grow, a new study determined.