Kevin Wheeler

Kevin Wheeler

Reporter, Life Sciences and Physical Sciences

@kdub_333

Kevin Wheeler, based in Peekskill, NY, covers Life Sciences and Physical Sciences for The Academic Times. Prior to that, Kevin wrote for Audubon Magazine, USA Today and KUT Public Media in Austin, Texas. He won the William J. Rowley Award for journalistic writing at the University at Albany. He graduated from the Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY in 2018.

Oil rigs stand in the Loco Hills field near Artesia, New Mexico, one of the most active regions of the Permian Basin. (AP Photo/Jeri Clausing)
Oil rigs stand in the Loco Hills field near Artesia, New Mexico, one of the most active regions of the Permian Basin. (AP Photo/Jeri Clausing) A new analysis of emissions from ethane, which are tied to methane emissions and largely attributable to oil and gas companies, shows that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is underestimating methane generated by the industry by 46% to 76%.

Genetically engineered E. coli bacteria may allow for more effective cancer drugs. (Shutterstock)
Genetically engineered E. coli bacteria may allow for more effective cancer drugs. (Shutterstock) Researchers from Yale University and Yale School of Medicine have genetically engineered E. coli bacteria to resist viral infection and undesirable gene transfer, opening up new pathways for medical research as well as better production of medicines, chemicals and numerous other products derived from biological sources.

Asthma has been linked to prenatal exposure to air pollution. (Shutterstock)
Asthma has been linked to prenatal exposure to air pollution. (Shutterstock) A new study of hundreds of mothers and their children is one of the first to link exposure to ultrafine particulate matter before birth to the development of asthma in early childhood.

In the Pacific Northwest, blue lakes may be getting bluer. (Unsplash/Sergei Akulich)
In the Pacific Northwest, blue lakes may be getting bluer. (Unsplash/Sergei Akulich) A new analysis of water body color confirms that lakes around the U.S. are reacting to their environments and changing their processes across entire landscapes, generating a useful tool for water managers and scientists for future study.

A man wipes the sweat from his face in the scorching heat at a business district in Tokyo. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara)
A man wipes the sweat from his face in the scorching heat at a business district in Tokyo. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara) As heat, humidity and populations rise, so too will heat stress by the end of the 21st century, researchers say, likely increasing the health risks of millions of people but also signaling another reason to reach important climate and emissions goals.

The winds that disperse a tree's pollen play a big part in tree diversity. (Pixabay/Couleur)
The winds that disperse a tree's pollen play a big part in tree diversity. (Pixabay/Couleur) Wind currents may shape tree genetics more than previously thought, with implications for the future of trees in the midst of climate change because pollen from those adapted to specific environments can reach distant areas where it may be unfavorable to other populations.

Oranges ripen on a tree in a grove in Clermont, Fla. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
Oranges ripen on a tree in a grove in Clermont, Fla. (AP Photo/John Raoux) Florida researchers have taken an important step toward combating a deadly disease devastating crops around the U.S. by developing a viral vector that generates a response without changing a citrus plant's genome.

That shipwreck is providing habitat for sea creatures, but what else is it doing? (Pexels/Leonardo Lamas)
That shipwreck is providing habitat for sea creatures, but what else is it doing? (Pexels/Leonardo Lamas) A yacht that sank almost 80 years ago has drastically altered the microbiome of its seafloor environment, raising questions about the role of artificial features, such as shipwrecks and oil rigs, in promoting habitat growth.

A portion of the tracksite “The Overlook,” with the individual prints marked by baking flour. (Anton Wroblewski)
A portion of the tracksite “The Overlook,” with the individual prints marked by baking flour. (Anton Wroblewski) Mammalian tracksites dating back to the Paleocene epoch are extremely rare, and researchers have just uncovered the largest one ever described, pushing back the evolutionary timeline of mammals by millions of years.

Atmospheric acids play a role in cloud formation. (Unsplash/Marc Wieland)
Atmospheric acids play a role in cloud formation. (Unsplash/Marc Wieland) Researchers have detected the chemical process that formaldehyde goes through to become formic acid, one of the most common acids found in the atmosphere, marking an important step in understanding the function of atmospheric acids.

You might think algae needs to be scrubbed off windows, but these windows use it! (Kyoung-Hee Kim)
You might think algae needs to be scrubbed off windows, but these windows use it! (Kyoung-Hee Kim) An architect has harnessed the photosynthetic power of microalgae to develop a new kind of "curtain" that could make offices and other commercial buildings greener in more ways than one.

Deforestation could counter an expected dropoff in the number and severity of wildfires worldwide. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)
Deforestation could counter an expected dropoff in the number and severity of wildfires worldwide. (AP Photo/Noah Berger) A new analysis of projected fire scenarios shows that the number and extent of wildfires will decrease worldwide later this century amid rising precipitation, population density and gross domestic products — but with a few concerning catches, as deforestation fires are still set to increase in some areas.