Margaret McIntyre

Margaret McIntyre

Reporter, Social Sciences and Business & Economics

@margaret_mci

Margaret McIntyre, based in Houston, Texas, covers Business & Economics and Social Sciences for The Academic Times. Her work as a journalist draws on prior professional experiences in public policy, international affairs and corporate risk consulting. Margaret obtained a Master of Science degree in political science from Uppsala University and a bachelor's degree from Texas A&M University. Her personal research interests include economic justice, welfare reform and sustainable governance.

Gifted programs only really benefit those who are privileged in other ways. (Pexels/Mary Taylor)
Gifted programs only really benefit those who are privileged in other ways. (Pexels/Mary Taylor) Black and low-income students are underrepresented in the typical elementary school gifted program and see fewer quantifiable academic benefits from such programs than their white peers — although overall gains from such programs may be small regardless of race and socioeconomic background.

It turns out hackers burn out just like their white-collar prey. (Unsplash/Mika Baumeister)
It turns out hackers burn out just like their white-collar prey. (Unsplash/Mika Baumeister) Hacker communities may not be as unconventional as they seem, with new research suggesting that they mirror many aspects of mainstream capitalist economies as they begin to grow and mature.

New York City subway passengers wear protective masks because of COVID-19 concerns. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
New York City subway passengers wear protective masks because of COVID-19 concerns. (AP Photo/John Minchillo) Relational and cognitive social capital might have played a key role in preventing higher rates of infection and death from COVID-19 in the U.S., according to a new study, with the strength of social connections remaining important for continued virus control and vaccination rates.

Corporate success may be measurable using machine learning. (Pexels/Andrea Piacquadio)
Corporate success may be measurable using machine learning. (Pexels/Andrea Piacquadio) A new machine-learning algorithm developed by business researchers was not only able to accurately predict the success of individual directors at public companies, but also to identify which directors are most likely to be unpopular with shareholders, an innovation that could help diversify corporate boards.

(AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
(AP Photo/Craig Ruttle) Political polarization in modern American politics likely can't be reduced by foreign threats and crisis events, according to new research, challenging notions held by political scientists that threats from abroad generate greater domestic unity across partisan divides.

Universal basic income might not be the complete answer. (Pixabay/Rudy and Peter Skitterians)
Universal basic income might not be the complete answer. (Pixabay/Rudy and Peter Skitterians) Employment-centered welfare policies might not adequately improve employment outcomes, especially if an increase in monetary incentives peaks at higher wage levels and people have been unemployed longer than 12 months, according to new research based on a universal basic income trial in Finland.

Traders who use insider info aren't necessarily well-off, since they don't win big with that knowledge. (Unsplash/Mike Kononov)
Traders who use insider info aren't necessarily well-off, since they don't win big with that knowledge. (Unsplash/Mike Kononov) Insider trading transactions earn the typical insider less than $500 per year more than the average investor, according to an analysis of U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission data, with insiders who reside in the same state as the firm's headquarters even less likely to see high profits.

Companies have a tough time walking the line between growth and going green. (Unsplash/Anton Eprev)
Companies have a tough time walking the line between growth and going green. (Unsplash/Anton Eprev) Companies that aim to reduce their environmental impact through greenhouse gas emissions demonstrate enhanced cost savings, improved financial performance and higher market value over the short and long term, new research suggests, although firms' emissions over time remain highly dependent on their market growth.

Firms with overseas employees could be reaping tax benefits through complex accounting rules. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
Firms with overseas employees could be reaping tax benefits through complex accounting rules. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa) U.S.-based multinational companies with higher numbers of overseas employees might be reaping more lucrative tax benefits compared to companies with predominantly U.S.-based employees, new research suggests, thanks to complex tax planning activities.

New evidence from New York shows paid family leave doesn't have to burden companies. (Pexels/John Finkelstein)
New evidence from New York shows paid family leave doesn't have to burden companies. (Pexels/John Finkelstein) Paid family leave policies need not burden employers with undue costs related to employee performance, ease of schedule coordination and planning for absences of duration, according to new research based on New York's 2018 paid family leave policy.

The SEC's hunt for state-sponsored terrorism might be letting corporate bad actors slip through the cracks. (AP Photo, File)
The SEC's hunt for state-sponsored terrorism might be letting corporate bad actors slip through the cracks. (AP Photo, File) The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's increased focus on tracing state-financed terrorism might detract from its ability to catch other important financial reporting errors, according to a new analysis.

We're starting to count the economic cost of the pandemic. (AP Photo/Emilio Espejel)
We're starting to count the economic cost of the pandemic. (AP Photo/Emilio Espejel) An inevitable trade-off exists between an epidemic's health consequences and its corresponding economic impacts, new research concludes, with the optimal containment strategy prioritizing lives and accepting a short-term recession in order to achieve a faster recovery in the years ahead.