Miles Martin

Miles Martin

Reporter, Life Sciences and Physical Sciences

Miles Martin, based in Kingston, Rhode Island, covers Life Sciences and Physical Sciences for The Academic Times. Prior to that, Miles worked on the media and communications team at Cell Press and as a freelance science writer. He holds an MSc in science communication and public engagement from the University of Edinburgh.

Believe it or not, adding plastic waste to concrete makes it more resistant to radiation. (Malkapur et al.)
Believe it or not, adding plastic waste to concrete makes it more resistant to radiation. (Malkapur et al.)By incorporating recycled waste plastic and other byproducts from the iron and steel industry, researchers have created a more sustainable version of concrete that shields nuclear radiation better than standard concrete.

A new, cheaper "food" for culturing cells will make stem cell research easier and cheaper. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)
A new, cheaper "food" for culturing cells will make stem cell research easier and cheaper. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)Researchers have created a highly affordable formula for a human stem cell growth medium that could save labs millions of dollars in reagent costs and eliminate the need for weekend "feeding" of stem cells.

Research inspired by the Phil Spector murder case make a fluid physics discovery. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
Research inspired by the Phil Spector murder case make a fluid physics discovery. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Inspired by the conviction of music producer Phil Spector for the 2003 murder of Lana Clarkson, researchers have discovered that when a gun is fired, gas from the muzzle escapes in a series of turbulent vortex rings that can cause blood spatter to reverse direction, splattering away from the shooter instead of toward them.

Single-use plastics of various types litter the deep ocean floor. (Jamstec)
Single-use plastics of various types litter the deep ocean floor. (Jamstec)By doing video surveillance deep in the ocean, researchers working in the North Pacific have discovered the densest accumulation of plastic waste ever recorded on an abyssal seafloor, finding that the majority of this waste is single-use packaging.

Maine's favorite crustacean hears with more than just its antennae. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)
Maine's favorite crustacean hears with more than just its antennae. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)Researchers have discovered that American lobsters can hear low frequencies, and that the mechanism for their hearing rests in external hairs on the surface of their exoskeleton, not in their antennae, as had been assumed.

Genetic material from older COVID-19 viruses found in dust could help in outbreak tracking. (NIAID/NIH via AP, File)
Genetic material from older COVID-19 viruses found in dust could help in outbreak tracking. (NIAID/NIH via AP, File)Researchers have found that the genetic material from the virus that causes COVID-19 can be extracted from indoor dust long after the virus is inactive, which could prove a useful tool for monitoring outbreaks of the disease.

3D-printed skin may soon be an option for diabetic skin issues. (Pixabay/Beeki)
3D-printed skin may soon be an option for diabetic skin issues. (Pixabay/Beeki)Scientists have used 3D cell printing to create a model of skin that mimics the skin ailments associated with diabetes, allowing researchers to study symptoms and therapeutics related to these conditions without relying on animal models.

Even nonlethal doses of agricultural chemicals can have big effects on bees. (Luis Claudi Silveira and Khalid Haddi)
Even nonlethal doses of agricultural chemicals can have big effects on bees. (Luis Claudi Silveira and Khalid Haddi)Researchers have found that even at doses too low to kill, agricultural chemicals impact the color preference, respiration and locomotion of native stingless bees in South and Central America.

A new way to combat a threat to one of the world's most vital crops has been invented. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
A new way to combat a threat to one of the world's most vital crops has been invented. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)Scientists have developed a method of using protein fragments to prevent the spread of orthotospoviruses, a widespread group of agricultural pathogens that are currently untreatable.

Researchers have developed a switch to turn genes on and off. (Wikimedia Commons/NIH Image Gallery)
Researchers have developed a switch to turn genes on and off. (Wikimedia Commons/NIH Image Gallery)U.S. researchers have developed a nondestructive gene-editing protein that acts as a simple off switch for genes, recreating the benefits of the widely used CRISPR-Cas9 system without permanently damaging cells’ genetic material.

Chronic pain is costing the U.S. billions. (AP Photo/Chris Post)
Chronic pain is costing the U.S. billions. (AP Photo/Chris Post)Researchers completing a large-scale genetic study of chronic pain in the U.K. have found differences between men and women that may help explain why the latter experience more chronic pain.

A longtime dream of many diabetics tired of needles is one step closer. (Trabolsi Research Group)
A longtime dream of many diabetics tired of needles is one step closer. (Trabolsi Research Group)By using nanomaterial layers to package insulin, researchers have developed a stable and effective method for administering the hormone orally without subjecting it to destruction by stomach acids, solving a long-time problem in pharmaceutical science.