Miles Martin

Miles Martin

Reporter, Life Sciences and Physical Sciences

Miles Martin, based in Kingston, Rhode Island, covers Life Sciences and Physical Sciences for The Academic Times. Prior to that, Miles worked on the media and communications team at Cell Press and as a freelance science writer. He holds an MSc in science communication and public engagement from the University of Edinburgh.

The link between too much sugar and mental changes is getting clearer. (Unsplash/Sharon McCutcheon)
The link between too much sugar and mental changes is getting clearer. (Unsplash/Sharon McCutcheon)After finding that a high-sugar diet early in life leads to both cognitive impairment and changes in the gut microbiome in adult rats, researchers were able to identify a single genus of gut bacteria as a causal connection between the latter two factors.

Some kinds of light are more dangerous to insects. (Unsplash/Sergei Zolkin)
Some kinds of light are more dangerous to insects. (Unsplash/Sergei Zolkin)Researchers are calling for fewer outdoor white LED lights, after determining that reducing the blue spectrum of artificial light can lessen the attraction of insects to nighttime light sources and minimize the dangers posed to insects.

A new test could help stop kidney transplant rejection. (AP Photo/Ebrahim Noroozi)
A new test could help stop kidney transplant rejection. (AP Photo/Ebrahim Noroozi)Researchers have developed a new urine test that allows doctors to diagnose and predict acute rejection of transplanted kidneys more quickly and accurately than current standard tests, potentially saving the U.S. millions of dollars in health care costs annually.

Pesticides are killing far more than their intended targets. (Renja Bereswill)
Pesticides are killing far more than their intended targets. (Renja Bereswill)By analyzing 25 years of pesticide use data from the United States, researchers have found that the toxicity of pesticides to nontarget invertebrates, including pollinators, has increased markedly, even though the volume of pesticides used has gone down.

An unlikely test subject led researchers to a DNA breakthrough. (Wikimedia/David Blakie)
An unlikely test subject led researchers to a DNA breakthrough. (Wikimedia/David Blakie)For the first time, researchers have successfully isolated both animal and human DNA from the air, paving the way for new and better ways to monitor animals noninvasively.

Invasive pines need soil fungus to prosper. (Jaime Moyano)
Invasive pines need soil fungus to prosper. (Jaime Moyano)Compared to noninvasive species, researchers have determined that invasive pine trees have a stronger dependence on fungi in the soil, refuting an established hypothesis that asserts invasive species should rely less on these mutualistic relationships.

A synthetic cell that behaves much like a living one has been created. (Emily Pelletier)
A synthetic cell that behaves much like a living one has been created. (Emily Pelletier)Researchers have identified seven essential genes for cell division in a simple synthetic cell, allowing those created in a lab to divide in a manner similar to natural cells.

Lead ammo is hurting birds of prey even though they're not hunted much. (Unsplash/Ian Tuck)
Lead ammo is hurting birds of prey even though they're not hunted much. (Unsplash/Ian Tuck)Analyzing the carcasses of rare birds of prey, European researchers found significant lead contamination in the raptors' bodies, including in soft tissues, in bones and as solid matter in the digestive tract.

Carbon in the water could affect fishes' ability to smell. (Wikimedia/David Blakie)
Carbon in the water could affect fishes' ability to smell. (Wikimedia/David Blakie)Researchers have found that increased carbon dioxide in the ocean interferes with gilthead seabreams' sense of smell both directly and indirectly — by reducing the sensitivity of their olfactory neurons and by acidifying the surrounding water.

Octopuses dream ... but about what? (S. L. Madeiros)
Octopuses dream ... but about what? (S. L. Madeiros)For the first time, scientists have shown that the color-changing patterns observed in octopuses as they sleep are characteristic of two major sleep phases: one active and one quiet.

New discoveries point to a very different evolution pattern for the human brain. (S.Benito-Kwiecinski/MRC LMB/Cell)
New discoveries point to a very different evolution pattern for the human brain. (S.Benito-Kwiecinski/MRC LMB/Cell)By using miniature brains artificially grown from stem cells, researchers have for the first time identified how the human brain manages to grow several times larger than those of other large primates.

Warmer temperatures lead to more children with diarrhea. (AP Photo/Amr Alfiky)
Warmer temperatures lead to more children with diarrhea. (AP Photo/Amr Alfiky)By analyzing nationwide records of temperature and diarrhea incidence in Peru, researchers have determined that a temperature increase of just 1 degree Celsius is associated with a 3.8% higher rate of childhood clinic visits for diarrhea, and that these increases are not mitigated by better water access.