Miles Martin

Miles Martin

Reporter, Life Sciences and Physical Sciences

@ArtfulSci

Miles Martin, based in Kingston, Rhode Island, covers Life Sciences and Physical Sciences for The Academic Times. Prior to that, Miles worked on the media and communications team at Cell Press and as a freelance science writer. He holds an MSc in science communication and public engagement from the University of Edinburgh.

Humans might be passing malaria to primates, which could lead to more outbreaks. (Unsplash/James Hoey)
Humans might be passing malaria to primates, which could lead to more outbreaks. (Unsplash/James Hoey) The genome of Plasmodium simium, a species of malaria parasite that mostly infects monkeys on the coast of Brazil, was found to be extremely similar to that of Plasmodium vivax, the most common cause of recurrent malaria in the Americas, strongly suggesting a recent jump between human and nonhuman primates that could result in new outbreaks of the disease.

Sharks don't have Google Maps, but they get around fine. (Unsplash/Gerald Schömbs)
Sharks don't have Google Maps, but they get around fine. (Unsplash/Gerald Schömbs) To navigate across the world for their migrations, sharks use the Earth’s magnetic field like a map to orient themselves towards home, according to a new study from biologists at Florida State University.

High-fructose corn syrup affects the way rats process opioids. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
High-fructose corn syrup affects the way rats process opioids. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke) Researchers studying rats have discovered that consuming high-fructose corn syrup alters their response to oxycodone in several contradictory ways, strengthening some aspects of the drug response while dampening others.

Tropical cyclones are making landfall more, and they're staying stronger after landfall. (NASA/NOAA via AP)
Tropical cyclones are making landfall more, and they're staying stronger after landfall. (NASA/NOAA via AP) Researchers reanalyzing historical data on tropical cyclones discovered that over the last four decades, one-quarter of landfalling cyclones over northeastern North America retained their tropical characteristics instead of weakening into a different storm type.

Humans are even worse for Australian ash forests than wildfires. (Unsplash/Neroli Wesley)
Humans are even worse for Australian ash forests than wildfires. (Unsplash/Neroli Wesley) By reconstructing the history of Australia's ash tree forests, researchers revealed that human disturbances from logging and post-fire salvage have more negative effects on the health of the ecosystem than natural disturbances from increasingly common wildfires.

We're getting closer to having a full map of vertebrate genomes. (NIH/Genome.gov)
We're getting closer to having a full map of vertebrate genomes. (NIH/Genome.gov) Researchers have published the most complete and highest-quality set of reference genomes for 16 vertebrate species, creating a resource that could help scientists address fundamental questions in biology, medicine and biodiversity conservation.

Scientists have found a way to buy the Great Barrier Reef some time in hopes that climate initiatives will have some effect. (David Westcott)
Scientists have found a way to buy the Great Barrier Reef some time in hopes that climate initiatives will have some effect. (David Westcott) By modeling the effects of climate change on the Great Barrier Reef over the next 50 years, researchers were able to determine a set of local interventions that could delay its decline by up to 20 years, allowing more time for global climate initiatives to take effect.

The eyes are the windows to the (very different) brains of these microscopic crustaceans. (Lin et al)
The eyes are the windows to the (very different) brains of these microscopic crustaceans. (Lin et al) Researchers have determined that the broad range of eye forms in hyperiid amphipods, a small group of microscopic crustaceans, is accompanied by significant variations in the organization of their brains.

Believe it or not, adding plastic waste to concrete makes it more resistant to radiation. (Malkapur et al.)
Believe it or not, adding plastic waste to concrete makes it more resistant to radiation. (Malkapur et al.) By incorporating recycled waste plastic and other byproducts from the iron and steel industry, researchers have created a more sustainable version of concrete that shields nuclear radiation better than standard concrete.

A new, cheaper "food" for culturing cells will make stem cell research easier and cheaper. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)
A new, cheaper "food" for culturing cells will make stem cell research easier and cheaper. (AP Photo/Richard Drew) Researchers have created a highly affordable formula for a human stem cell growth medium that could save labs millions of dollars in reagent costs and eliminate the need for weekend "feeding" of stem cells.

Research inspired by the Phil Spector murder case make a fluid physics discovery. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
Research inspired by the Phil Spector murder case make a fluid physics discovery. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong) Inspired by the conviction of music producer Phil Spector for the 2003 murder of Lana Clarkson, researchers have discovered that when a gun is fired, gas from the muzzle escapes in a series of turbulent vortex rings that can cause blood spatter to reverse direction, splattering away from the shooter instead of toward them.

Single-use plastics of various types litter the deep ocean floor. (Jamstec)
Single-use plastics of various types litter the deep ocean floor. (Jamstec) By doing video surveillance deep in the ocean, researchers working in the North Pacific have discovered the densest accumulation of plastic waste ever recorded on an abyssal seafloor, finding that the majority of this waste is single-use packaging.