Miles Martin

Miles Martin

Reporter, Life Sciences and Physical Sciences

Miles Martin, based in Kingston, Rhode Island, covers Life Sciences and Physical Sciences for The Academic Times. Prior to that, Miles worked on the media and communications team at Cell Press and as a freelance science writer. He holds an MSc in science communication and public engagement from the University of Edinburgh.

A gut parasite can lead to major illness elsewhere. (Pixabay/JimCoote)
A gut parasite can lead to major illness elsewhere. (Pixabay/JimCoote)Researchers have found that infection with parasitic helminth worms in the gut can act as a gateway for worsening infections from neuropathic viruses in mice by causing the natural microbiome in the gut to spread throughout the body, shifting the focus of the immune system away from the viral infection and ultimately making the mice more vulnerable to serious complications or death.

Life reconstruction of Aquilolamna milarcae (Vullo et al., Science [2021])

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Life reconstruction of Aquilolamna milarcae (Vullo et al., Science [2021])

.By working with a rare fossil found in northeastern Mexico in 2012, scientists have successfully reconstructed a 66 million-year-old shark that looked similar to modern-day manta rays, providing previously unknown insights into the morphology of cartilaginous fishes of the late Cretaceous.

Get a glimpse of life inside the hive. (Unsplash/Bob Jaglicic)
Get a glimpse of life inside the hive. (Unsplash/Bob Jaglicic)By zeroing in on individual comb cells in honeybee hives, researchers have captured highly detailed footage of the insects, offering valuable insights into bee behavior that has remained largely hidden inside the hive, including rare behaviors that have never been recorded.

Some mushrooms might have anti-aging magic. (Pixabay/Meik Schmidt)
Some mushrooms might have anti-aging magic. (Pixabay/Meik Schmidt)By analyzing extracts from the discarded underground component of wood-decaying mushrooms known as the mycelium, researchers have uncovered a host of compounds with skin-protecting properties, providing some of the first detailed evidence for the anti-aging properties of mushroom mycelia.

Nanotechnology might cure a scourge of Latin America: Chagas' disease. (Unsplash/Jason Miller)
Nanotechnology might cure a scourge of Latin America: Chagas' disease. (Unsplash/Jason Miller)Researchers have developed a new treatment method that shows promise for Chagas' disease — which can contribute to heart disease and is caused by a tropical parasite found primarily in Latin America — by using nanotechnology to deliver the drug directly to affected tissues in an effort to eliminate the severe side effects associated with available medications.

Infinitely recyclable plastic is possible, but it needs to be cheaper. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)
Infinitely recyclable plastic is possible, but it needs to be cheaper. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)Massachusetts Institute of Technology researchers described a method for producing a sustainable, fast-drying fabric by manipulating the mechanical properties of polyethylene, the most widely produced plastic, despite the fact that polyethylene is totally waterproof.

Polyurethane is getting an upgrade. (AP Photo/Holly Ramer)
Polyurethane is getting an upgrade. (AP Photo/Holly Ramer)Researchers from Purdue University have developed a new form of water-based polyurethane that incorporates a cellulose nanomaterial to make the coating stronger and more stable, solving a known issue with water-based polyurethanes and reducing the need to rely on toxic solvents for industrial-grade polyurethane.

UV light can help knock down COVID-19. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
UV light can help knock down COVID-19. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)By modeling the flow of SARS-CoV-2 respiratory droplets through space, researchers have added new findings to continuing debates on the appropriate safe distance for avoiding transmission of the virus that causes COVID-19, and also demonstrated that using ultraviolet-C irradiation to inactivate the virus may be a safe approach to attenuating its spread.

Greenhouse gases might have fueled Midwest flooding. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)
Greenhouse gases might have fueled Midwest flooding. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Researchers have implicated a climate change-driven weather system known as the Midwest Water Hose in the 2019 floods that devastated large expanses of the U.S. region, noting that it has been accelerated by increasing greenhouse gas emissions over the last 40 years and is only expected to cause more damage as climate change continues.

New research shows bone marrow can regenerate. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
New research shows bone marrow can regenerate. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)A research team from the University of Osaka has discovered that as certain stem cells in bone marrow die, they release chemical signals that start a multi-step process triggering living cells to proliferate. This allows bone marrow to slowly regenerate, even after severe damage from chemotherapy.

Frogs use their lungs to hear better. (Norman Lee)
Frogs use their lungs to hear better. (Norman Lee)Scientists have discovered that by inflating their lungs, frogs can diminish their sensitivity to certain sound frequencies, making it easier to hear calls from their own species while tuning out those of others.

Octopuses feel pain and react accordingly. (Unsplash/Janavara Machado)
Octopuses feel pain and react accordingly. (Unsplash/Janavara Machado)Researchers have determined that octopuses — the most neurologically complex invertebrates — both feel pain and remember it, responding with sophisticated behaviors and shedding new light on the unsolved mystery of how invertebrate animals experience pain.