Monisha Ravisetti

Monisha Ravisetti

Reporter, Life Sciences and Physical Sciences

Monisha Ravisetti, based in New York, covers Life Sciences and Physical Sciences for The Academic Times. Prior to that, Monisha worked at Weill Cornell Medical College, Mount Sinai West and NYU Langone conducting clinical and basic science research. She graduated with a degree focused in philosophy, physics and chemistry from New York University, and her work investigates the intersection between science and the human condition.

A new "stretchy" battery mimics DNA.(Pixabay/Public Domain)
A new "stretchy" battery mimics DNA.(Pixabay/Public Domain)A newly developed prototype for a wearable, elastic battery mimics the structure of biological DNA and could better meet growing demand sparked by advancements in robotics and a rising interest in smartwatches, sleep-monitoring devices and other technology-driven fashions and medical tools.

Smartphones might be great detectors of solar disruptions. (AP Photo/Enid News & Eagle, Joe Rickets)
Smartphones might be great detectors of solar disruptions. (AP Photo/Enid News & Eagle, Joe Rickets)Massive solar storms in space can be picked up by iOS and Android smartphones, meaning billions of people have a personal geomagnetic storm detector — but the signals threaten to interfere with future location-based applications.

Quantum computing has finally met the internet. (Matteo Pompili for QuTech)
Quantum computing has finally met the internet. (Matteo Pompili for QuTech)The dawn of the quantum internet has begun: A group of scientists successfully built a fully functional prototype of such a network, which uses diamonds as a foundation and calls on paradoxical quantum concepts that were once restricted to the pages of a textbook.

Physicists have concluded that some masses of boson particles don't actually exist. (Unsplash/John Paul Summers)
Physicists have concluded that some masses of boson particles don't actually exist. (Unsplash/John Paul Summers)Physicists have concluded that some masses of boson particles — members of the things-that-could-explain-dark-matter club — don't actually exist, meaning the parameters for locating the presumably vast but hypothetical material just became more refined.

A popular method for determining water pollution may be wildly inaccurate. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)
A popular method for determining water pollution may be wildly inaccurate. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)A technique used worldwide to determine organic carbon pollution in natural waters has been revealed to overestimate concentration levels by up to 90%, meaning some environmental policies may be based on considerably incorrect data.

Harmless-looking white dwarf stars might be carrying an explosive surprise. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Wisconsin via AP)
Harmless-looking white dwarf stars might be carrying an explosive surprise. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Wisconsin via AP)Physicists may have discovered the first naturally occurring "bombs" lying dormant within white dwarf stars roaming outer space, and if detonated, the explosive material could force an entire star's destruction.

A rare orchid has a very creative way of handling its pollination. (Callan Cohen)
A rare orchid has a very creative way of handling its pollination. (Callan Cohen)An extremely uncommon African orchid has been found to control, in a peculiar way, how its fellow flowers are pollinated: by releasing an aphrodisiac-like chemical that ignites the lust of a male longhorn beetle, consequently tricking the insect into engaging in sexual activity.

Gravity might have a simpler origin than dark matter. (NASA)
Gravity might have a simpler origin than dark matter. (NASA)The question of where gravity comes from is a seemingly eternal one among theoretical physicists, and most answers involve dark matter, which can't be accounted for by regular physics. But a new theory offers an explanation that can be explored with existing equations: Gravity might originate in the quantum vacuum.

Carbon nanofibers are great for manufacturing but bad for some wildlife. (AP Photo/Peter Prengaman)
Carbon nanofibers are great for manufacturing but bad for some wildlife. (AP Photo/Peter Prengaman)Aerospace and medical device breakthroughs are sharply increasing demand for special materials called carbon nanofibers, but these emerging compounds could add to a long list of pollutants that inadvertently poison animals — particularly, Amazonian turtles.

Global warming is causing temperature-driven sea migrations. (Unsplash/Dorothea Oldani)
Global warming is causing temperature-driven sea migrations. (Unsplash/Dorothea Oldani)A sweeping analysis of the movements of tens of thousands of aquatic species has shown that because of global warming, animals that once thrived in the ideal environment of the tropics are journeying away from home.

A new drug to treat EEE is showing a lot of promise. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
A new drug to treat EEE is showing a lot of promise. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)The nightmare of COVID-19 spurred a wake-up call among immunologists, leading several experts to band together and create a list of 100 organisms most likely to cause the next pandemic. Having steadily conjured treatment and prevention routes for dozens, their most recent achievement surrounds a protein molecule that targets the deadly virus Eastern equine encephalitis.

Genetic analysis found that certain dogs are more at risk for cancer than others. (AP Photo/Jonathan Copper)
Genetic analysis found that certain dogs are more at risk for cancer than others. (AP Photo/Jonathan Copper)Genetic analysis of several hundred dogs revealed that breeds predisposed to histiocytic sarcoma have corresponding gene variants, and because humans are also susceptible to this rare form of cancer, the findings could help inform therapeutic strategies for canines and people alike.