Monisha Ravisetti

Monisha Ravisetti

Reporter, Life Sciences and Physical Sciences

Monisha Ravisetti, based in New York, covers Life Sciences and Physical Sciences for The Academic Times. Prior to that, Monisha worked at Weill Cornell Medical College, Mount Sinai West and NYU Langone conducting clinical and basic science research. She graduated with a degree focused in philosophy, physics and chemistry from New York University, and her work investigates the intersection between science and the human condition.

A new antiviral drug has promise against a host of dreaded diseases. (AP Photo/File)
A new antiviral drug has promise against a host of dreaded diseases. (AP Photo/File)A new antiviral drug shown to be effective both in vivo in mice and in vitro in human cell lines appears to treat more than 10 deadly viruses that currently have no commercial medication. The extensive pool contains devastating ailments such as Zika virus, dengue fever, Ebola, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis and even COVID-19.

Data science can help make giant study groups comprehensible. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
Data science can help make giant study groups comprehensible. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)Researchers have found a way to leverage statistical modeling methods to simplify the vital but costly and time-consuming process of reproducing results from extensive meta-analysis studies, which can include millions of subjects.

Trees and shrubs could help make steel. (AP Photo/Mary Esch)
Trees and shrubs could help make steel. (AP Photo/Mary Esch)As climate change necessitates an increasingly urgent shift away from fossil fuels and toward renewable energy, researchers are exploring strategies for using excess forest trees and shrubs as organic plant-based energy sources in the emissions-heavy iron and steel industry.

You've never seen a black hole in this light. (EHT Collaboration)
You've never seen a black hole in this light. (EHT Collaboration)A collaboration of hundreds of researchers from around the world has published unprecedented imagery of a black hole that captures how the phenomenon looks in polarized light, clearly showing its magnetic fields.

Mercury pollution in the Great Lakes is outstripping our ability to remove it. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)
Mercury pollution in the Great Lakes is outstripping our ability to remove it. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)The United States Geological Survey has determined that high mercury levels in the Great Lakes' ecosystem — enough to catalyze a chain of events leading to human consumption of the dangerous chemical — is largely due to remnants of pollution from old industries and other chemical-rich sources that no longer exist.

Long-term stress can make you sick. (Unsplash/Tim Gouw)
Long-term stress can make you sick. (Unsplash/Tim Gouw)A causal relationship between stress and the immune system has now been confirmed in humans, potentially offering insight into how chronic stress affects the body — particularly when associated with mental health conditions.

Space might hold a wealth of molecules. (Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian, M. Weiss)
Space might hold a wealth of molecules. (Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian, M. Weiss)Scientists have located tons of essential aromatic compounds in a special yet unexpected laboratory that's naturally conducive to examining the highly reactive and typically transient molecules: outer space.

Simulations show reopening universities isn't without risk. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)
Simulations show reopening universities isn't without risk. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)Summer is approaching, COVID-19 appears to have an end in sight and colleges are heading toward normalcy for the 2021 academic year, but after running simulations of the virus' transmission rate at U.S. universities, researchers are urging that reopening only be considered if the pandemic's familiar safety precautions and bulk rapid testing policies are both strictly enforced.

We're getting closer to fabricating patches for injured hearts. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
We're getting closer to fabricating patches for injured hearts. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)Year after year, heart disease maintains its consistent status as the world's leading cause of death, with its mortality rate in the U.S. equalling one death every 36 seconds. But to alleviate its burden, researchers are steadily working toward a future with human engineered heart tissue patches that can heal hearts harmed by the condition.

For those over 26, getting the HPV vaccine might not make financial sense. (AP Photo/John Amis)
For those over 26, getting the HPV vaccine might not make financial sense. (AP Photo/John Amis)Advisors to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are considering recommending that the agency extend the recommended HPV vaccination age to cover people beyond age 26 — but public health experts working on their behalf found that the vaccine is not cost-effective for men or women above that threshold.

Gene therapy could short-circuit the opioid epidemic.
Gene therapy could short-circuit the opioid epidemic.America's opioid epidemic is rooted in patients' desperation for pain relief, and in a new study, researchers described a potential alternative to the toxic, addictive and dangerous drugs: repressing the body's pain-encoding gene.

The brain has hacks to keep itself in balance. (Pixabay/Pete Linforth)
The brain has hacks to keep itself in balance. (Pixabay/Pete Linforth)Time and time again, scientists have shown that the brain's ideal state rests on the critical point between order and disorder, but only recently did it come to light that when the organ naturally deviates from this location, it behaves in a specific way that keeps its performance at maximum levels.