Nathan Worcester

Nathan Worcester

Senior Editor, Mind & Behavior and Technology

Nathan Worcester, based in Chicago, is the senior editor for Mind & Behavior and Technology for The Academic Times. Prior to that, Nathan wrote for various publications in Chicago. He has also worked as a technical writer for multiple law firms and served as managing editor of the New Art Examiner. He studied philosophy, history and English at the University of Chicago.

A new drug cocktail shows promise for headache pain. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
A new drug cocktail shows promise for headache pain. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)Emergency room doctors in the Bronx have successfully alleviated posttraumatic headache by combining the dopamine antagonist metoclopramide with diphenhydramine, better known as Benadryl, in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. An hour after treatment, patients who took the two drugs had less headache pain than patients who took a placebo.

Do you think expensive wine tastes better? (Unsplash/Vince Veras)
Do you think expensive wine tastes better? (Unsplash/Vince Veras)Inexpensive wine could be nicer than you think, at least if someone lies to you about how much it cost: in a realistic field experiment, researchers who deceived participants about the price of wines discovered that budget wine tasted better when it was presented as expensive.

New polymers may allow robots to "heal." (Pixabay/849536)
New polymers may allow robots to "heal." (Pixabay/849536)Researchers have developed a new composite polymer for use in emerging soft robotics technologies that can be programmed to morph in air or underwater when exposed to light and return to its original shape when the light is turned off. The polymer can even heal itself if cut in two — light causes the halves to fuse back together.

A common piece of household medical equipment can help find COVID-19.(Pixabay/Paul Hunt)
A common piece of household medical equipment can help find COVID-19.(Pixabay/Paul Hunt)Millions of diabetes patients use inexpensive glucometers to track their blood sugar. Now, scientists are seeking to adapt that technology for COVID-19 testing, underscoring the new possibilities of glucometer-based diagnostics at a time of rising medical costs.

Is art or nature more powerful? A new study looks at the question. (Pixabay/Eric Perlin)
Is art or nature more powerful? A new study looks at the question. (Pixabay/Eric Perlin)An interdisciplinary team including psychologists and a philosopher has used virtual reality to test whether art or nature prompted different experiences of the sublime, marshaling cutting-edge technology in an effort to settle a centuries-old debate in art and philosophy.

People care about the very poor, but less about making them equal. (Pixabay/ 晨 朱)
People care about the very poor, but less about making them equal. (Pixabay/ 晨 朱)Japanese researchers have shed more light on the psychology of why we care about economic inequality: using mouse-tracking data from people choosing between options for distributing money virtually to others, they showed that people care less about equalizing resources overall than about helping the neediest.

Robots are becoming more and more lifelike. (Carl Strathearn)
Robots are becoming more and more lifelike. (Carl Strathearn)British researchers have created a new robotic mouth system that uses machine learning and a novel mechanism modeled after human cheek muscles to better synchronize speech and mouth movements in realistic, human-like robots, bringing us closer to the day when people can comfortably socialize with those automatons.

Drone hijacking is a real threat. (Unsplash/Jason Blackeye)
Drone hijacking is a real threat. (Unsplash/Jason Blackeye)South Korean researchers have invented a new anti-drone technology, called Tractor Beam in a nod to "Star Wars," that can use fake GPS signals to fool dangerous drones, commandeering them and flying them to a safe landing site.

20% of health workers suffered acute stress/PTSD from the pandemic. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno)
20% of health workers suffered acute stress/PTSD from the pandemic. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno)Doctors, nurses and other health care professionals battling COVID-19 are suffering from high rates of depression, anxiety, and PTSD, with each of these conditions affecting roughly one in five workers, according to a comprehensive new review and meta-analysis of studies published Wednesday.

Innovations that don't fit with our preconceptions might be rejected. (Unsplash/CDC)
Innovations that don't fit with our preconceptions might be rejected. (Unsplash/CDC)A large new behavioral experiment suggests that human cognitive biases could limit innovation over multiple generations, shedding light on how we build on prior knowledge and how these biases might hinder our overall technological progress.

Can groupthink influence the stock market? (Unsplash/Maxim Hopman)
Can groupthink influence the stock market? (Unsplash/Maxim Hopman)Stanford neuroscientists have discovered that collective brain activity can forecast the movement of actual stock prices, even in instances when conscious decision-making and traditional indicators such as price volatility did not.

Want a good night's sleep? Unplug from work. (Damir Spanic/Unsplash)
Want a good night's sleep? Unplug from work. (Damir Spanic/Unsplash)Swiss and German researchers have found that perceived social support from colleagues and supervisors improves workers’ sleep quality by helping them detach, or “unplug,” from their jobs in their off hours, painting a more complex picture of the relationship between sleep and work.