Nathan Worcester

Nathan Worcester

Senior Editor, Mind & Behavior and Technology

Nathan Worcester, based in Chicago, is the senior editor for Mind & Behavior and Technology for The Academic Times. Prior to that, Nathan wrote for various publications in Chicago. He has also worked as a technical writer for multiple law firms and served as managing editor of the New Art Examiner. He studied philosophy, history and English at the University of Chicago.

Sweat cools, but it can also power. (Unsplash/Nathan Dumlao)
Sweat cools, but it can also power. (Unsplash/Nathan Dumlao)Japanese scientists have unveiled a new biofuel cell bracelet that runs on the lactate in sweat, with its six interconnected cells generating up to 3.6 volts — enough power to run a digital wristwatch for 12 hours.

A new study gives a look into the psychology of selfies. (Pixabay/Ajiu Prasetyo)
A new study gives a look into the psychology of selfies. (Pixabay/Ajiu Prasetyo)Attachment anxiety and national culture may shape the way we take, edit and post selfies on social media, according to new research that expands our understanding of how and why we manage our public image and reveals who may be at risk of negative outcomes from social media use.

A new method opens old letters without touching them. (Brienne Collection)
A new method opens old letters without touching them. (Brienne Collection)After examining more than 250,000 historical letters, researchers have introduced a new, automated approach for virtually unfolding and reading sealed documents, testing it on four letter packets from the Brienne Collection, a scholarly treasure chest of undelivered mail from Renaissance Europe — and even reading a sealed letter from 1697.

Keto diets help Alzheimer's patients function better. (Unsplash/Christine Siracusa)
Keto diets help Alzheimer's patients function better. (Unsplash/Christine Siracusa)Patients with Alzheimer’s disease enjoyed better daily function and quality of life on a ketogenic diet than a low-fat diet, a new study found, offering insight into brain metabolism and a possible new direction for treatment.

Our brains use memory tricks to help us remember.(Unsplash/Laura Fuhrman)
Our brains use memory tricks to help us remember.(Unsplash/Laura Fuhrman)Our brains can distort long-term memories in adaptive ways, helping us distinguish between similar events by amplifying the differences that we recall between them, neuroscientists from the University of Oregon and New York University discovered in a new study.

Position and length of career have no link to CTE. (Pixabay/Keith Johnston)
Position and length of career have no link to CTE. (Pixabay/Keith Johnston)Chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disorder linked to repeated head injuries, is not associated with either the duration of an athlete’s career or the position the athlete played, according to a retrospective cohort study of elite football and hockey players, contrasting previous research and adding to a heated debate over the safety of collision sports.