Nick Gallagher

Nick Gallagher

Reporter, Mind & Behavior and Technology

@_nick_gallagher

Nick Gallagher, based in Brooklyn, New York, covers Mind & Behavior and Technology for The Academic Times. Prior to that, Nick wrote articles for the Brooklyn Eagle, Brooklyn Magazine and Popula, among other outlets. He is a graduate of the Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY.

We still can't see dark matter, but we can simulate where it is. (Shutterstock)
We still can't see dark matter, but we can simulate where it is. (Shutterstock)Researchers have developed a neural network that can generate highly detailed cosmological simulations of dark matter by scaling up massive low-resolution images at speeds a thousand times faster than previous models, allowing scientists to better understand how the universe evolved.

A new system lets you pick colors over and over. (Unsplash/Robert Katzki)
A new system lets you pick colors over and over. (Unsplash/Robert Katzki)A new system uses ultraviolet light to reprint colors and designs onto objects, allowing artists and developers to quickly preview their creations and test new ideas on tangible items rather than through a digital interface alone.

Pictured is a conceptual Oblique Detonation Wave Engine-powered hypersonic aircraft. (Composite: Daniel A. Rosato, Background: NASA)
Pictured is a conceptual Oblique Detonation Wave Engine-powered hypersonic aircraft. (Composite: Daniel A. Rosato, Background: NASA)
Researchers are developing a new hypersonic engine based on detonations, which are explosions that send waves at rates faster than the speed of sound, with the ultimate aim of producing a propulsion system for the interplanetary planes and rockets of the future that harnesses the same type of energy emitted by supernovas.

People suffering from chronic pain may go to great lengths to avoid potentially painful situations.  (Unsplash/Adrian Swancar)
People suffering from chronic pain may go to great lengths to avoid potentially painful situations.  (Unsplash/Adrian Swancar)For the first time, researchers observed people avoiding certain body movements due to conditioned pain responses — a phenomenon known as generalized avoidance — extending our understanding of a fundamental principle in behavioral psychology and potentially informing future treatments of chronic pain.

In this March 11, 2020, photo, a laboratory technician prepares COVID-19 patient samples for semi-automatic testing at Northwell Health Labs, in Lake Success, N.Y. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
In this March 11, 2020, photo, a laboratory technician prepares COVID-19 patient samples for semi-automatic testing at Northwell Health Labs, in Lake Success, N.Y. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)An international team has created a digital system for logging and categorizing new COVID-19 genome sequence data that, at the time of writing, was over 3,000 times faster than its closest competitor, allowing researchers to identify and target potentially dangerous viral strains more efficiently as they emerge in real time.

The researchers were inspired by echolocation techniques already found in nature. (Unsplash/Courtnie Tosana)
The researchers were inspired by echolocation techniques already found in nature. (Unsplash/Courtnie Tosana)Researchers at the University of Glasgow have developed a system that, after being trained, can create a three-dimensional image of a room, along with the moving objects or people within it, with nothing but a single sensor that sends and receives acoustic and radio waves as they bounce around the space.

People who give help to others for a living might need it themselves. (AP Photo/Andreea Alexandru)
People who give help to others for a living might need it themselves. (AP Photo/Andreea Alexandru)Australian welfare support workers, a category including home health aides, nursing aides, and similar occupations that often involve caring for elderly patients and people with disabilities, are roughly 50% more likely to die by suicide than workers in other industries, in line with findings of elevated suicide rates in health care-related sectors such as social work and nursing.

A long-standing mathematical limit on the size of social circles is being challenged. (Pexels/Jeffrey Czum)
A long-standing mathematical limit on the size of social circles is being challenged. (Pexels/Jeffrey Czum)A team of Swedish researchers has found no basis for the existence of Dunbar's number, a hypothesized average of the number of individuals who can practically fit within a functioning social circle, often cited as 150 people.

Bioluminescence is beautiful at the beach, and now it'll help detect buried explosives.
Bioluminescence is beautiful at the beach, and now it'll help detect buried explosives.Researchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem have developed a sensor that can rapidly locate buried explosives with the help of genetically engineered, bioluminescent E. coli bacteria, allowing field workers to search for dangerous buried ordnance from afar.

Does Bach make you want a burger? Tchaikovsky for tofu? Music can influence our food choices. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
Does Bach make you want a burger? Tchaikovsky for tofu? Music can influence our food choices. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)Research in China and Denmark has revealed that, across cultures, certain types of music can cause people to spend more time fixating on healthy foods than on unhealthy alternatives, suggesting healthy eating habits could be promoted through the use of sound.

Hallucinogens such as peyote could have therapeutic uses with the aid of a new sensor. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
Hallucinogens such as peyote could have therapeutic uses with the aid of a new sensor. (AP Photo/LM Otero)A new bioluminescent sensor can identify substances that provide the clinical benefits of hallucinogenic drugs for depression, substance use disorder and other conditions without hallucinogens' intense psychoactive side effects, allowing researchers to find potential psychiatric treatments more efficiently.

Interviews with a Kenyan group lead to new insight on PTSD. (Unsplash/Imani Manyara)
Interviews with a Kenyan group lead to new insight on PTSD. (Unsplash/Imani Manyara)Members of the Turkana, a pastoralist ethnic group in northwest Kenya, have post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms following herding raids and other traumatic events, like those seen in U.S. service members after combat, suggesting PTSD may be a human universal.