Patrick Hoff

Patrick Hoff

Senior Editor, Business & Economics and Social Sciences

@PatrckHoff

Patrick Hoff, based in Boston, is the senior editor for Business & Economics and Social Sciences for The Academic Times. Prior to that, Patrick worked at the Charleston Regional Business Journal as a staff writer covering aerospace, banking and finance, real estate, and the Port of Charleston, among other topics. Patrick graduated with a bachelor’s degree in journalism from the University of Massachusetts.

A help wanted sign on the door of a Target store in Uniontown, Pa. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)
A help wanted sign on the door of a Target store in Uniontown, Pa. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)High school and college graduates entering the workforce during a recession may see lower wages and lower levels of employment even after the economy recovers, with adverse impacts potentially lasting into middle age, researchers found.

London street art mocks Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. (Annie Spratt, Unsplash)
London street art mocks Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. (Annie Spratt, Unsplash)Breaking up tech giants is likely to fall short of reining in their market dominance, but granting users more control over the use of their personal data could make a stronger impact, an economist said in a new research paper.

A headline in a newspaper describes impact on the job market from the coronavirus pandemic. (James Yarema, Unsplash.)
A headline in a newspaper describes impact on the job market from the coronavirus pandemic. (James Yarema, Unsplash.)Government intervention at the onset of the coronavirus pandemic helped to prop up U.S. wages even as demand for labor plummeted by nearly 30%, according to an intensive review of job advertisement data.

Tourists wander a market square in Krakow, Poland. (Jacek Dylag, Unsplash)
Tourists wander a market square in Krakow, Poland. (Jacek Dylag, Unsplash)Tourism specialization can lead to economic gains and improved human development for transition countries, although the effects might only be temporary, researchers found.

Working from home appears to most benefit already high-earning workers, according to a new study. (Marta Filipczyk, Unsplash)
Working from home appears to most benefit already high-earning workers, according to a new study. (Marta Filipczyk, Unsplash)Giving employees greater ability to work from home increases average income, but the benefit goes mostly to already high-earning workers, new research shows, indicating how policies implemented in response to the coronavirus pandemic could widen economic inequality.

Animals wander by a pile of rubbish and garbage near the sea in Albania. (Antoine Giret, Unsplash)
Animals wander by a pile of rubbish and garbage near the sea in Albania. (Antoine Giret, Unsplash)Recovery from the coronavirus pandemic offers the world a unique opportunity to replace a linear economic model with a more circular framework, enhancing resilience and sustainability, according to study by nearly a dozen researchers.