Reece Wallace

Reece Wallace

Reporter, Social Sciences and Business & Economics

Reece Wallace, based in Houston, Texas, covers Business & Economics and Social Sciences for The Academic Times. He holds a master's degree from the University of Chicago and a BA from Tufts University.

A protester holds a sign referencing the QAnon conspiracy theory while waiting to enter a campaign rally with U.S. President Donald Trump in Wilkes-Barre, Pa, in August 2018. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)
A protester holds a sign referencing the QAnon conspiracy theory while waiting to enter a campaign rally with U.S. President Donald Trump in Wilkes-Barre, Pa, in August 2018. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)Particular cultural values are correlated with widespread belief in conspiracy theories, new research shows, posing a challenge for countries and governments struggling to combat the influence of such ideas.

A police car in Washington, D.C. (Photo by Matt Popovich on Unsplash)
A police car in Washington, D.C. (Photo by Matt Popovich on Unsplash)White and Black Americans’ different judgments on the facts and circumstances of police shootings are best explained by each group’s preexisting beliefs concerning police bias and the likely culpability of victims, new research concluded, exposing thorny obstacles in the quest to build civic trust among social groups and the institutions sworn to protect them.

The United States Capitol in Washington, D.C. (Photo by Louis Velazquez on Unsplash)
The United States Capitol in Washington, D.C. (Photo by Louis Velazquez on Unsplash)Contrary to the widespread belief that many or most citizens reward elected officials for their shows of opposition to political foes, new evidence suggests that Americans still prefer representation by leaders they believe share their policy views and are responsive to their constituents.

U.S. banks' influence over the IMF leads to high profits. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
U.S. banks' influence over the IMF leads to high profits. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)Loan programs administered by the International Monetary Fund increase income inequality in the countries that are recipients of them, according to recent research, a finding that calls the organization’s commitment to goals including sustainable development and poverty reduction into question.