Theo Wayt

Theo Wayt

Senior Reporter, Business & Economics and Social Sciences

@theo_wayt

Theo Wayt, based in New Orleans, is the senior reporter for Business & Economics and Social Sciences for The Academic Times. He has also reported for the Associated Press, NBC News, the New York Post, Vice, Gothamist and Business Insider, covering topics like finance, politics and labor. He graduated from New York University in 2020.

Americans are broadly supportive of policies that would let most prisoners out of jail early, based on certain conditions. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
Americans are broadly supportive of policies that would let most prisoners out of jail early, based on certain conditions. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg) Americans from across the political spectrum support policies designed to release many incarcerated people from prison early, new research shows.

Those of us who learned to drive during the '70s oil crises still tend to log fewer miles than others. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)
Those of us who learned to drive during the '70s oil crises still tend to log fewer miles than others. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes) Americans who came of age and learned to drive during the oil crises of the 1970s still logged significantly fewer miles on the road in the year 2000, according to new research from economists at the U.S. Federal Reserve and University of Pennsylvania.

Homes in floodplains are floating on overvaluation. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)
Homes in floodplains are floating on overvaluation. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio) Single-family homes in U.S. floodplains are overvalued by a total of $43.8 billion, new research shows, highlighting the unsustainability of real estate markets in the face of escalating climate change.

Kratom use is legal at the federal level, but several states are less indulgent, and its therapeutic properties are unproven as yet. (AP Photo/Mary Esch)
Kratom use is legal at the federal level, but several states are less indulgent, and its therapeutic properties are unproven as yet. (AP Photo/Mary Esch) Americans' use of kratom, a plant-based drug often promoted as an alternative to opioids that has been banned in several states, is rare overall but more common among those who use other drugs, according to research published Thursday.

Blacks and other minorities bear the brunt of U.S. air pollution. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Blacks and other minorities bear the brunt of U.S. air pollution. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski) Racial and ethnic minorities in the U.S. are consistently exposed to more deadly fine particulate air pollution on average than white people, a disparity that is present across virtually all regions and income levels, research published Wednesday shows.

Climate change policies will help the planet but exacerbate poverty in many areas of the world, especially sub-Saharan Africa. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Climate change policies will help the planet but exacerbate poverty in many areas of the world, especially sub-Saharan Africa. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay) Efforts to reduce climate change in line with Paris Agreement goals could push an additional 50 million people into extreme poverty by 2030 unless widespread economic redistribution efforts are implemented, according to new research.

Governments that cleave to Christianity tend to have citizens who become less attached to the faith over time. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
Governments that cleave to Christianity tend to have citizens who become less attached to the faith over time. (AP Photo/LM Otero) Countries with governments that favor Christianity cause their citizens to become less attached to their faith and, eventually, lead to a decline in the percentage of the population that identifies as Christian, two social science researchers have suggested, based on an analysis of 166 countries.

A significant percentage of people who went electric for their vehicles switched back, often due to frustrations with charging. (AP Photo/Neha Mehrotra)
A significant percentage of people who went electric for their vehicles switched back, often due to frustrations with charging. (AP Photo/Neha Mehrotra) One in five people who purchased an electric vehicle in California later abandoned the technology, largely because of charging-related hassles, according to a first-of-its kind study that suggests more work is necessary to bring electric vehicles to the mass market.

Overcrowded prisons in Central and South America are driving outbreaks of tuberculosis. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
Overcrowded prisons in Central and South America are driving outbreaks of tuberculosis. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg) Mass incarceration in Central and South America in recent decades has driven an escalating tuberculosis crisis within prisons, threatening progress against one of the world's deadliest diseases, according to new research.

One media company's local TV stations have political influence over their viewers. (AP Photo/Scott Sonner)
One media company's local TV stations have political influence over their viewers. (AP Photo/Scott Sonner) Living in an area with a television news station owned by Sinclair Broadcast Group, the U.S.'s second-largest local TV company, makes viewers less likely to vote for Democratic presidential candidates and lowers their approval of Democratic presidents, according to new research.

Job interviewers going easy on one candidate may have a negative effect on the ones who follow. (Unsplash/Christina @ wocintechchat.com )
Job interviewers going easy on one candidate may have a negative effect on the ones who follow. (Unsplash/Christina @ wocintechchat.com ) After interviewers evaluate one job candidate generously, they tend to be harsher toward subsequent applicants, according to a new paper by an international group of researchers.

Chronic pain is costing the U.S. billions. (AP Photo/Chris Post)
Chronic pain is costing the U.S. billions. (AP Photo/Chris Post) One in five Americans suffer from chronic pain, limiting their daily function and causing nearly $300 billion in lost productivity each year, according to new work by Harvard University researchers.