Zack Fishman

Zack Fishman

Reporter, Life Sciences and Physical Sciences

Zack Fishman, based in Chicago, covers Life Sciences and Physical Sciences for The Academic Times. Previously, Zack received his M.S. in journalism at Northwestern University, specializing in health, environment and science reporting, and his B.S. in engineering physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Pulsars fire beams of electromagnetic radiation from two poles as a result of their large magnetic fields and rapid spinning. (Jurik Peter)
Pulsars fire beams of electromagnetic radiation from two poles as a result of their large magnetic fields and rapid spinning. (Jurik Peter)Astronomers searched dense clusters of stars in the Milky Way and found eight previously unknown millisecond pulsars, ultradense supernova remnants that appear to "pulse" in the sky and can complete a rotation in a tiny fraction of a second.

Light can enter different states, too. (Pixabay/Ralf Vetterle)
Light can enter different states, too. (Pixabay/Ralf Vetterle)Using photons fused with quantum effects into an extreme form of matter, German physicists generated and detected a new state of light, expanding scientists' understanding of how light behaves and opening a path for further investigation into other strange forms allowed by quantum mechanics.

Humans are restricting elephants' room to roam. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Humans are restricting elephants' room to roam. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)By tracking hundreds of African elephants for 15 years, conservation scientists have determined that the endangered large mammals could roam more than three-fifths of Africa — nearly six times the size of their current habitat — if not for the growing presence of humans, including threats from ivory poachers on the continent.

An interstellar visitor comes from a home similar to our own. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)
An interstellar visitor comes from a home similar to our own. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)New observations of the second known outside visitor to our solar system, a comet named Borisov, reveal information about its composition as well as its home system, which seems to contain comets similar to those orbiting the sun and Jupiter-like planets that toss around other objects with their massive gravity.

The messages sent between cells can be translated.(Pixabay/Cassiopeia Arts)
The messages sent between cells can be translated.(Pixabay/Cassiopeia Arts)Biologists and mathematicians have joined forces to create CellChat, a tool that interprets communications from one cell to another with more nuance than previous translation programs, using social-network theories to untangle complex molecular signals.

Vegetation fires in the Southern Hemisphere could be warming Antarctica. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Jana)
Vegetation fires in the Southern Hemisphere could be warming Antarctica. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Jana)The naturally pristine atmosphere above Antarctica nevertheless contains black carbon, a heat-trapping air pollutant, and a new study found that it is largely produced by vegetative fires of both natural and human causes in South America, Africa and Oceania.

The second may not be the same ever again. (AP Photo/ Focke Strangmann)
The second may not be the same ever again. (AP Photo/ Focke Strangmann)Making some of the most precise measurements ever, a network of researchers closely compared three clocks that track the activity of atoms to tell time, an important step toward formally redefining the second to a more accurate standard.

A very tiny brain probe could help scientists gather more mouse data. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
A very tiny brain probe could help scientists gather more mouse data. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)An experimental COVID-19 vaccine containing gold nanoparticles and coronavirus RNA successfully triggered an immune response in mice, laying the groundwork for further testing and demonstrating the promise of nanotechnology in vaccine development.

Older COVID-19 patients are more likely to be reinfected. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)
Older COVID-19 patients are more likely to be reinfected. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)An analysis of more than two-thirds of people in Denmark found that less than 1% who were infected during the country's spring wave of COVID-19 got reinfected during a winter surge. Although the Danes' "natural immunity" remained stable for at least six months, older people were at much higher risk of reinfection than the rest of the population.

A model of a human embryo might be a game-changer for research. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
A model of a human embryo might be a game-changer for research. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)Two teams of scientists independently created the first clusters of cells that behave like human embryos days after fertilization, known as blastocysts. Dubbed "human blastoids," the models could be a boon for research into early human development and pregnancy and fertility issues, but also raise questions on the ethical status of these cell groups.

A crater is showing us some of Mars' history. (NASA)
A crater is showing us some of Mars' history. (NASA)Taking advantage of an impact crater inside a larger crater on a Martian volcanic dome, planetary scientists identified the composition of a volcano billions of years old, in addition to evidence of ancient water flows and unprecedented glacial formation in the red planet's far past.

The oceans will become pollution emitters before long. (Unsplash/Tudor Adrian)
The oceans will become pollution emitters before long. (Unsplash/Tudor Adrian)Scientific modeling has revealed that the oceans will stop absorbing chemicals that destroy the atmosphere's ozone layer and begin emitting them in less than 55 years, doing so in detectable amounts by 2145, and climate change will further accelerate the ocean's sink-to-source transition.